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Method for detecting allergens from lupin seeds with a high specificity

Scientists at the CSIC have developed a procedure to detect allergens from lupin seeds in processed and non-processed food, including cross-contamination. It has a high specificity, as it detects traces of different isoforms of the main lupin allergenic proteins.

 

Lupin beans. Picture: Tamorlan, CC BY 3.0 Wikimedia. Because of their nutritional properties, lupin (also called lupino beans) is increasingly used in bread and pasta, desserts, ice-cream, cakes, etc. Lupin are rich in protein and fibre, is low-fat gluten-free.

But lupin can also cause an allergic reaction. It has been included in a list of 14 allergens (Regulation No. 78/2014) which are recognized across Europe as the most common ingredients or processing aids that can trigger food allergies. Therefore, any food product containing lupin has to clearly inform the consumer with the “it may content” statement on the label. Therefore, methods for detecting and quantifying the content of lupin are required.

Scientists at the CSIC have developed a procedure to detect allergens from lupin seed in processed and non-processed food, including cross-contamination..  The invention is based on an improved antibody, which detects the main allergenic proteins of Lupin, namely beta-conglutins.

 

It has a high specificity, as it detects traces of different isoforms of the main lupin allergenic proteins

The method can detect and quantify the content of allergenic proteins in the food samples, either fresh or frozen in liquid, solid, cream, emulsion, or even granular form.

Now, industrial partners from the food industry are being sought to collaborate through a patent licence agreement.

This is not the first method of its type. But its novelty is its high specificity, as it detects traces of different isoforms of the main lupin allergenic proteins, beta-conglutins.

Some previous methods lack specificity as they may detect the presence of general proteins from lupin seeds which are not be allergens.

Contact:

Antonio Jiménez Escrig
Vicepresidencia Adjunta
de Transferencia del Conocimiento -CSIC
Tel: (+34) 91 568 19 30
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Scientists at the CSIC have developed a procedure to detect allergens from lupin seeds in processed and non-processed food, including cross-contamination. It has a high specificity, as it detects traces of different isoforms of the main lupin allergenic proteins.